The Arc Blog and Podcasts

Q&A with Clare Monagle on her The Scholastic Project

Why did you decide to write another book on medieval theology? I have two core reasons for writing The Scholastic Project. The first is that I wanted to provide an accessible introduction to medieval Christian theology, particularly that which we call scholastic theology. This term refers to the elite ‘high’ theology of Thomas Aquinas or Duns Scotus, for example, which emerges from the universities of medieval Europe. In my experience, a number of medievalists are very nervous about teaching or reading scholastic theology, or in sharing it with their students. There is good reason for this, the texts are really...

Continue Reading →

Elizabeth Melick on Unusual Giants

"Now bigin ichil…" (Of Unusual Giants) He hadde tuenti men strengthe, And fourti fet of lengthe, Thilke panim hede, And four fet in the face, Ymeten in the place, And fiften in brede, His nose was a fot and more, His browe as brestles wore, He that it seighe it sede He loked lotheliche And was swart as piche Of him men might adrede. The passage above is from the Middle English romance Roland and Vernagu, which I am currently editing for a volume of four linked Charlemagne romances. This particular passage occurs about halfway through the poem, and it...

Continue Reading →

Q&A with Richard Utz on Medievalism: A Manifesto

Richard Utz is Chair and Professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at the Georgia Institute of Technology and President of the International Society for the Study of Medievalism. He is the author of Literarischer Nominalismus im Spätmittelalter (1990) and Chaucer and the Discourse of German Philology (2002), and coeditor of Medievalism in the Modern World (with Tom Shippey, 1998) and of Medievalism: Key Critical Terms (with Elizabeth Emery, 2014). He is also the founding editor of Medievally Speaking, an open access review journal encouraging critical engagement with all manifestations of medieval culture in postmedieval times. There are...

Continue Reading →

Medieval Metre is Seriously Cool. Seriously!

by Jane Toswell, co-author of our new book Early English Poetic Culture and Meter: The Influence of G. R. Russom So why should I learn about Old and Middle English metre anyway? Well, it's true, metre can be a hard subject.  Hearing the rhythm in words and the aural patterns of repetition and imagery can be hard today, as students of English literature know.  If they have the choice, they often don't want to study poetry.  But poetry is worth the effort.  Bob Dylan just won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his poetry, and the metre of his poetry...

Continue Reading →

Preparing for the Publisher Meetings

This past year, I’ve had the pleasure of attending several conferences, each with their different flavors: the 22nd Annual ACMRS Conference in Scottsdale, AZ; the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy in Boston; the Association for Asian Studies Conference in Seattle; the Kalamazoo International Congress on Medieval Studies; and the Leeds International Medieval Congress. So. Much. Travel. And I'm really learning that it's necessary to play favorites with airlines — and to sometimes skip flying with a particular one altogether, if it doesn't even provide you with a glass of water free of charge (I'm looking at you, Frontier!). Airline ordeals aside, the conferences were great,...

Continue Reading →

The World of Books: An Acquisitions Editor on Reading, Contracting, and Writing Great Medieval History Books

All acquisitions editors must be thankful for the fifteenth century. Not only did Johannes Gutenberg usher in the so-called ‘Printing Revolution’ when he started to use a movable-type printing press while in Strasbourg, ultimately providing us all with employment, but perhaps more importantly, Muhammad ibn Sa’id al-Dhabhani  started to brew coffee in the Yemen, without which none of us would be able to do our jobs. The truth spoken here in jest is surely the remarkable potential for writing and publishing to bring together different parts of the world into closer connection to one another, often in unexpected ways. Great...

Continue Reading →

Guide for Authors on Blog Writing

We would like to feature your book on the MIP-Arc blog, and would be delighted if you can provide a short text (between 500 and 1000 words) which we could use. We believe that you as the author personally writing the post makes a difference, as you are the expert on your book. A blog post provides an opportunity for you to highlight the key findings and features of your book in more detail than the standard book jacket or website blurb allows. Blog posts should be readable and informative, and the aim is to encourage people to seek out...

Continue Reading →

Back to School with METS: Moving Beyond the Usual Medieval Canon of Chaucer and Malory

All across the country, universities are resuming classes. How exciting! One of the toughest things about formulating a new class is working up the syllabus. Every teacher wants to bring something new to the students – something they wish they themselves had the opportunity to read when they were taking a similar class, perhaps. Or the chance to share with their students something they are working on and thinking about now, really drawing the class into the active-research side of academia, and bringing them the very latest and most cutting-edge things. "The purpose of the TEAMS series, under the wise...

Continue Reading →

Dr. Palmer Reviews Early Latin Commentaries on the Apocalypse

This is a useful addition to recent literature on eschatological writing in the first millennium. In 2011 William Weinrich published translations of some of the most important commentaries on Revelation, by Victorinus of Petovium, Apringius of Beja, Caesarius of Arles and the Venerable Bede. A second translation of Bede’s work, with an invaluable and rich commentary, was published by Faith Wallis in 2013. To these Francis Gumerlock now adds translations of two fascinating but neglected works: the late-seventh-century Commemoratorium (or ‘handbook’) and the eighth-century Pauca problesmata (also known as the as Irish Reference Bible). Both of these texts display Irish...

Continue Reading →

Maken Melodye on #WhanthatAprilleday16

Goode Friendes and Readers of Arc Blog, Yt doth fill my litel herte wyth gret happinesse to invyte yow to the thirde yeare of a moost blisful and plesinge celebracioun. On the first daye of Aprille, lat us make tyme to take joye yn alle langages that are yclept ‘old,’ or ‘middel,’ or ‘auncient,’ or ‘archaic,’ or, alas, even ‘dead.’ Thys feest ys yclept ‘Whan That Aprille Day.’ For thys yeare yt ys: 'Whan That Aprille Day 16.' #whanthataprilleday16 Ich do invyte yow to joyne me and manye othir goode folk yn a celebracioun across the entyre globe of the...

Continue Reading →