September 2016

Preparing for the Publisher Meetings

This past year, I’ve had the pleasure of attending several conferences, each with their different flavors: the 22nd Annual ACMRS Conference in Scottsdale, AZ; the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy in Boston; the Association for Asian Studies Conference in Seattle; the Kalamazoo International Congress on Medieval Studies; and the Leeds International Medieval Congress. So. Much. Travel. And I'm really learning that it's necessary to play favorites with airlines — and to sometimes skip flying with a particular one altogether, if it doesn't even provide you with a glass of water free of charge (I'm looking at you, Frontier!). Airline ordeals aside, the conferences were great,...

Continue Reading →

The World of Books: An Acquisitions Editor on Reading, Contracting, and Writing Great Medieval History Books

All acquisitions editors must be thankful for the fifteenth century. Not only did Johannes Gutenberg usher in the so-called ‘Printing Revolution’ when he started to use a movable-type printing press while in Strasbourg, ultimately providing us all with employment, but perhaps more importantly, Muhammad ibn Sa’id al-Dhabhani  started to brew coffee in the Yemen, without which none of us would be able to do our jobs. The truth spoken here in jest is surely the remarkable potential for writing and publishing to bring together different parts of the world into closer connection to one another, often in unexpected ways. Great...

Continue Reading →

Guide for Authors on Blog Writing

We would like to feature your book on the MIP-Arc blog, and would be delighted if you can provide a short text (between 500 and 1000 words) which we could use. We believe that you as the author personally writing the post makes a difference, as you are the expert on your book. A blog post provides an opportunity for you to highlight the key findings and features of your book in more detail than the standard book jacket or website blurb allows. Blog posts should be readable and informative, and the aim is to encourage people to seek out...

Continue Reading →

Back to School with METS: Moving Beyond the Usual Medieval Canon of Chaucer and Malory

All across the country, universities are resuming classes. How exciting! One of the toughest things about formulating a new class is working up the syllabus. Every teacher wants to bring something new to the students – something they wish they themselves had the opportunity to read when they were taking a similar class, perhaps. Or the chance to share with their students something they are working on and thinking about now, really drawing the class into the active-research side of academia, and bringing them the very latest and most cutting-edge things. "The purpose of the TEAMS series, under the wise...

Continue Reading →